Government Watch / National Security / Politics

Zelenskyy in Person

AMAC Exclusive – By Herald Boas

Zelenskyy

The surprise visit of Ukrainian President Vlodomyr Zelenskyy to Washington, D.C. to meet with President Joe Biden and address a joint session of Congress was an event full of drama, tension, and ceremony befitting both the circumstances and the individual who performed it.

Like Ronald Reagan before him, Mr. Zelenskyy had a previous and considerable career as an actor. As Mr. Reagan did so many times, the Ukrainian president demonstrated the skill and value of his professional career, and created a short but powerful international moment in political public relations.

Wearing his iconic military-green sweatshirt, speaking excellent if heavily accented English, quoting the words of past statesmen, and citing a canny choice of past events in world and U.S. history, Mr. Zelenskyy brought the otherwise warring legislators of the two major U.S. political parties together in repeated standing ovations.

That is not to say that there was unanimity in support for Mr. Zelenskyy and his presentation. Some members of Congress and several pundits have questioned his record in Kiev and his expectations of financial and weaponry aid from the U.S. Some commentators have said Mr. Zelenskyy’s stated aims to recover all territories seized by Russian President Vladimir Putin and his armed forces are unrealistic, asserting that Ukraine cannot ultimately prevail in a drawn-out war with its much larger neighbor. Other commentators have criticized Mr. Zelenskyy’s government for its apparent suppression of the Russian Orthodox Church in Ukraine, and alleged continued corruption, which had been rampant before he took office in 2019. Still other critics acknowledge Mr. Zelenskyy’s personal courage and leadership, but say his endless appeals for U.S. aid are an unacceptable blank check.

Mr. Zelenskyy’s supporters have rebutted the criticisms by noting that the Ukrainian armed forces have repulsed the larger Russian army for many months, that Russian Orthodox clerics in Ukraine are often sympathetic to Russia in the conflict and pose a security threat in wartime, and that Zelenskyy has made serious efforts to remove corruption in his country.

The seemingly endless requests for financial aid and weapons, however, appear to be the primary argument against President Zelenskyy and his visit — which featured, in addition to his expressions of gratitude for assistance already given, an aggressive request for more money.

It is on this latter issue which reveals the largest perspective, not only of Mr. Zelenskyy’s dramatic U.S. visit, but of the deeper meaning of his and his nation’s current struggle.

In 1939, Nazi Germany made a deal with Soviet Russia that led to the invasion of Poland — and directly to World War II. Having divided the spoils of that aggression, Germany proceeded to conquer most of the rest of Europe while the Soviet Union invaded neighboring Finland. Prior to 1939, Nazi Germany had overtaken considerable neighboring territory by mere threat while the European democracies stood by. The Rhineland, Austria, and Czechoslovakia each were overtaken without a fight. Finland, however, fought back against the much larger Soviet army, and heroically succeeded for several months. At the same time, the island nation of Great Britain held out against Nazi conquest until Germany’s Axis ally Japan attacked the U.S. at Pearl Harbor, bringing the U.S. into the world war on Great Britain’s side. Germany next made a surprise invasion of its erstwhile Soviet Union ally, suddenly making Russia part of the Allied effort, an alliance which the Russians promptly ended soon after the war’s end.

The continent of Europe has seen armed conflict, invasion, and subjugation for more than a thousand years. World War II was only the latest and one of the most brutal examples — and when the war ended, a historic effort was made, under the leadership of the U.S. and its Marshall Plan, to halt the cycle of hostilities by rebuilding the battered European democracies and enabling the defeated enemy nations of Germany, Italy, and Japan to reconstitute themselves as free capitalist democracies. The Soviet Union, a Marxist dictatorship, chose to oppose this effort, leading to a prolonged Cold War that only ended with the demise of the Soviet Union in 1990-91.

But initial efforts to establish a democratic Russia failed, and by the second decade of the 21st century, Russian leaders began to implement the goal of reassembling the old Soviet Union. The centerpiece of that ambition was the recovery of what had been the Ukrainian communist part of the U.S.S.R., but the Ukrainians, now restored to their historic independent identity, chose to resist.

As Anne Applebaum recently and persuasively wrote, if Mr. Zelenskyy, his populace, and its army had not fought back in February 2022, the Russians would have crushed Ukrainian independence, killed or imprisoned many of them, and massed its army on the eastern European borders with intention of further invasions to subjugate neighboring countries. Not only would Russia have interpreted a quick successful invasion as proof the NATO countries would not oppose them, but the two other global ambitious totalitarian powers, China and Iran, would have also assumed they would not be opposed in their quests in Asia and the Middle East.

To be fair, Mr. Zelenskyy’s critics have some valid points. U.S. aid, financial and military, is not an endless resource for Ukraine. Already, some of our own supplies of ammunition, missiles, and other weaponry are getting low — and the U.S budget, deeply in the red, cannot provide unlimited billions of dollars in foreign aid with so many critical domestic needs. Calls for an audit of what the U.S. does send to Ukraine are also reasonable, given past histories of such aid to other countries when aid, principally food and money, never reached the people that it was intended to help.

In short, the current conflict in Ukraine cannot go on indefinitely, neither for the much-suffering Ukrainian people, nor the rest of Europe, nor for Russia, also depleted in war materiel and suffering from the impact of a global embargo from much of the western world.

Beyond the drama of Mr. Zelenskyy’s short visit to the American capital, and its public relations success, remain the uncertainties of this unfortunate conflict, the misery and hardship it is causing on all sides, and the ability of its perpetrators to sustain its human and economic costs.

Something has to give.


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Rich
5 months ago

We can only pray for the Ukrainian people and try to help them with direct humanitarian aid. Before we embrace Zelenskyy we should look to his past. Giving him a warm cuddly hug is like giving Pelosi, Schumer and Biden a hug. As they say, birds of a feather flock together.

Harry L Guzaliak Jr
5 months ago

By the way I’m of Ukraine heritage.

Harry L Guzaliak Jr
5 months ago

Zelensky is nothing more than Putin 2.0

Ezra MAGID
5 months ago

Support Ukraine now to degrade and deter Putin’s plans for Moldova and beyond. China will see reluctance to support Ukraine for the duration as the green light for Taiwan. It’s annoying to read and listen to dozens of government, TV and print “experts” that have never visited Ukraine. The corruption reform transformation I saw since Zelensky was elected is unprecedented in the region. Seems former actors make great leaders. #PeaceThroughStrength

Jimb
5 months ago

This is the poster child for corruption. Of course he’s here asking for more as there’s always “10% for the Big Guy” coming out of every dollar.

Ken
5 months ago

Just another despot to dump billions to…
If anyone thinks America is still a democratic republic they should have their head examined

James
5 months ago

I’m extremely disappointed in AMAC’s support of this tyrant. Yes, he was an actor who dresses in drag for his performances. To compare him to Ronald Regan is absurd! He also is killing his own people. Just ask the Ukrainian people. He was placed in his position by the deep state and is head of the Neo Nazi fascist party in Ukraine that are killing its own people under the disguise that it is Russia doing it all. He takes billions of dollars from the Biden administration and American taxpayers to pay for his bio labs that are being used to kill people. Just look it up because it is out there. If this is AMAC’s stance, then I might have to reconsider my subscription with them!

Guy Cooksey
5 months ago
Reply to  James

1,000 uploads. This man is a tyrant and CANNOT be trusted at all! Ukraine is NOT a part of NATO and have wasted tens of billions of our dollars. peace could have been made months ago, but the deep state is keeping this going. How we miss Trump!

Jim
5 months ago
Reply to  James

Well said, I feel the same

Jr
5 months ago

Does this article represent Amac’s position?

If so, it makes me reconsider the subscription

Jim
5 months ago
Reply to  Jr

Yes

bill gustafson
5 months ago
Reply to  Jr

I guess Amac wants America bankrupt.

Arkady
5 months ago

Today Ukraine is a nazi country, a papet of NATO, and a system to wash the grift money back to corruption in USA and EU. Zelenskyy, the leader, and dictator of Ukraine, has been supported by some American politicians, the CIA, and George Soros. What a combination of the swamp. American money sent to Ukraine is stolen from the needs of the country: border security, high inflation, homelessness, drugs addiction, and many others. The money are used to full the war, the cocaine addiction of Zelenskyy, and bribes to the Ukrainian nazi elite. Monaco is a favorite destination for these stollen funds.

Westhus
5 months ago

The U.S. response to this conflict (pouring financial and military aid in, in greater proportions than the neighboring nations like Germany) is once again having long-term detrimental effects on our fiscal situation as well as our readiness. You would think that, after the experiences in the former Yugoslavia in the ‘90’s, as well as other international situations, that the DC Intel, policy and strategy turds would have developed other solutions that would achieve similar objectives as simply sending countries cash and ammo. I guess it’s too much to ask those dingleberries to actually do their jobs instead of worrying about being as WOKE as possible.

Jim
5 months ago
Reply to  Westhus

Why can’t I vote on this ?

Lanore Dixon
5 months ago

Yes, something has to give, but Democratic nations should not give an inch to Russian invaders. Whatever happened to “we fight them over there so we don’t have to fight them over here?”

Jim
5 months ago
Reply to  Lanore Dixon

Immigrant invaders to the USA are ok though huh?

Rich
5 months ago
Reply to  Jim

Yes, we can turn our heads on the greatest humanitarian crisis in America at the southern border and leave Afghanistan to the Taliban but we have to support the Ukraine. Something is fishy and will be revealed soon.

Caroline
5 months ago

100 billion AMERICAN TAXPAYERS CASH to the coke head puppet installed by Mccain Obama Graham Neuland. Beyond disgraceful

Honey
5 months ago

I read every comment here because I wanted to be helped to understand.

(I loved plandemic – but why the 3 instead of the e?)

My conclusion?

Simply put. If the American Left loved this country, and liberty, it would not have fought so hard to make Biden President, and none of this horror would be happening – at least not for four years. And maybe for longer.

Sherry
5 months ago

Well Son of a B*tch….says the big guy that gets 10% from Ukraine.
At the beginning of “this” war, Zelensky and Putin were willing to compromise, but the U.K stepped in and said “NO” to Zelensky.
Don’t forget that “this” war started in 2014 with Obama starting the Maidan Revolution.
Several years ago, the Azov military was NOT supported by the U.S.A. due to the fact they are Nazis.
NATO, WEF, United Nations are now all a part of the New World Order.
I trust Putin more than the current Faux administration!

trp
5 months ago

Russia is already sitting on most of the territory it wants. Is there any chance the Ukrainians can ever retake It, even with our military and economic support? So, the war is devolving into a stalemate. How many billions will we have to devote to maintain the status quo? Both the U.S. and Ukraine need to face reality and try to work out a settlement.

Bob
5 months ago
Reply to  trp

Then we should take it back. That is the reality of messing with the United States .. and also being stupid enough to make your own enemy into an ally of the United States.

Joe Blow
5 months ago

“…the Russians would have crushed Ukrainian independence, killed or imprisoned many of them, and massed its army on the eastern European borders with intention of further invasions to subjugate neighboring countries.”
With what troops? The great Russian boogeyman doesn’t have the ability to conquer all of Ukraine, let alone keep going. Their objective was a buffer against NATO- a NATO that has consistently pushed against Russia’s zone of influence and was threatening to push NATO right to Russia’s border. Putin may or may not want to be Hitler, regardless he has no ability to invade Europe.

Bob
5 months ago
Reply to  Joe Blow

Define “push” against. NATO does not pose a threat .. unless attacked. Russian is entitled to no “zones” of influence, any more than is Romania. The US declared the Monroe Doctrine because we could .. Russia cannot .. it is it in a crowded urban neighborhood .. not in the wild open endless West, where one can establish ‘buffer zones’ an inch beyond one’s fully fenced and titled property line.

Dave
5 months ago

We are directly responsible for this war and it’s consequences. we are prolonging a war that will not end in Ukrainian victory only Ukrainian destruction. From Libya, to Iraq, Afghanistan, and Syria, in the last 30 years we have created nothing but misery and death and destabilized north Africa, the middle and near east and now Eastern Europe. Ukraine is not in our national interest and our continued support will further destabilize and risk a global war. Europe has the resources and absent our support would be more inclined to seek a peaceful solution. Expansion of NATO has only created war and not security. The united States needs to protect it’s true national interests and avoid another world war created in Europe.

Perry LaGuardia
5 months ago
Reply to  Dave

Ukraine became our national interest the moment Russia was stupid enough to make them into our ally .. before that, who cares. But now it matters. Leave. The Kid. Alone.

youtu.be/F7XtwFA3gcY

Perry LaGuardia
5 months ago
Reply to  Dave

Ukraine became our national interest the moment Russia was stupid enough to make them into our ally .. before that, who cares. But now it matters. Leave. The Kid. Alone.

Caroline
5 months ago
Reply to  Dave

Spot on !! NATO , tge destroyers of culture and countries

Sonicboom
5 months ago

Supporting Ukraine in it’s with Russia is the only thing Biden has done right. Of course had the 2020 election not been stolen, a President Trump would never have let Ukraine occur. America is done for anyway; democracy? Its not for everyone.

james carlyle
5 months ago

The history of the Ukraine and their sometimes comrades, the Russians, does not lend itself to support from the Western Nations. We are diverse cultures and we do not have the resources to support the self destructive objectives of either the Ukraine nor Russia. Nor The CCP, nor Taiwan, not the EU and all their self destructive bad choices.

dan mullock
5 months ago

I am a conservative Republican who spent 7 years in military intelligence long ago (Soviet military capabilities and government) and speak a little Russian, have been to Kiev several times on business. I say this to point out i am generally well informed on this subject. Here is what I think:

  • we have spent at least $100 billion per year over the last 20 years on readiness to stop a Russian military invasion of Europe. For what will eventually be $65 billion from us and perhaps another $15 billion from all other sources, Ukraine is ruining the Russian military capability to project military force beyond its borders. Russia has no credible capability to sustain any kind of attack on Nato anymore. They have lost thousands of their most combat ready tanks and armor, many of their combat pilots, and approximately half their most combat ready front line forces (not total forces) to death or injury. So, for 3% of our two decade spend on facing off with Russia, we have crushed them via our Ukrainian surrogates with no American military lives lost. Only 3%!
  • a lot of the military aid is/was pre-existing stocks, bought to support Europe defense. It worked, and was already spent money. So it counts as spending but is not out of pocket until we replace it which will take quite a while.
  • The US, Britain and Russia signed a treaty to respect Ukraine borders if they gave up their nuclear weapons, which they did. So while that is not the same as being a NATO member, it certainly was done with the expectation by Ukraine and the US that we would be receptive to defense support should they need it. So to say that we have no defense obligations is not accurate, and shame on the Biden administration for doing such a poor job to highlight this.
  • The Russians are bloody fascists and the Ukrainians are completely not to blame. If Russia did not invade there would be no war, and no war crimes of which Russia is clearly guilty many times over.

It is legit to question overseas spending when we struggle at home. But on its own merits, the Ukraine spend is consistent with long term defense policy in Europe, relatively cheap, and without sacrificing our military. And it is the right thing to do. We wasted several trillion dollars losing the peace in the mid-East and Afghanistan. We are winning it on the cheap in Eastern Europe.

PaulE
5 months ago
Reply to  dan mullock

Thank you for the excellent, expert analysis of the subject. One of the so-called benefits to come out of this situation, if you want to view it that way, is that Russia has been shown to be far less of a real and credible military threat using conventional armaments than most western leaders have thought of up until now. Remember, all those military budget assumptions used over those 20 years were likely based on the now falsely proved assumption that conventional Russian military forces were far more capable than they have proven to be.

Oh and yes, I agree we squandered several trillion dollars over the same 20 year period of time in the Middle East and Afghanistan.

chrisford1
5 months ago
Reply to  dan mullock

Your defense dollars argument is nonsense as it assumes that this US fomented proxy war saves money without any costs coming from the Russians and Chinese and others not wanting US_NATO hegemony.
No one who has been in region would think you are an American. You appear to be a Ukrainian propagandist now spewing the Zelenskyy Administration’s talking points that endless money and weapons to Ukraine is “Sucha Mighty Fine Deal” for Americans , and that there was a deal where “Ukraine gave up their nuclear weapons”. So much for your military intelligence bona fides,. Soviet nukes were still under control of Moscow and its nuclear units in the Navy, AF, or Navy, Not in control of the Uzbekistanis, Belorussians, Georgians, Latvians, Ukrainians, Tajikistanism etc.

Perry LaGuardia
5 months ago
Reply to  chrisford1

youtu.be/F7XtwFA3gcY

No longer matters .. Ukraine is now our ally

Arkady
5 months ago

Not ally, but a puppet.

Something, Something
5 months ago
Reply to  dan mullock

The problem is we used them up now but cannot replace them quickly. Thus our own military capabilities are diminished and we cannot fix that quickly if another threat comes to pass. In addition the new armaments we acquire will be much more costly to replace then the ones we have already paid for. All in all, it seems we have spent a large sum of money in a short period of time with no end in sight to spending even more money. I applaud the Ukraine people, they have suffered terribly from Germany and Russian through their history. Nevertheless, this looks like another forever war with no end in sight and just another example of neocon fantasies that will never come true. Let us leave honorably and let the Russians and Europeans come to a truce. It is their territory, time for them to put up or shut up.

PaulE
5 months ago
Reply to  dan mullock

I see my simple comment to you still remains “awaiting for approval”. Clearly the Christmas spirit must have bypassed the AMAC moderator. Anyway, excellent comment on your part.

Arkady
5 months ago
Reply to  dan mullock

Is bloody McCain your body? Most of your assessment of the situation is wrong and based on propaganda that somehow Russia wants to take over the world. I suggest you learn from real annalist like Douglas Macgregor. The life is not only about winning and killing.

Jim
5 months ago
Reply to  dan mullock

The Uke Nazis had been shelling the ethnic Russians civilians in Donbass since 2014. You want to back Nazi genocide?

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