Opinion / Press Releases

The Majority of Seniors Are Homebodies at Heart

Seniors

WASHINGTON, DC, Sep 23 — “Be it ever so humble there is no place like home!” It’s a comforting old ditty. But, according to the Association of Mature American Citizens [AMAC], it’s also the wish of the vast numbers of seniors.

AMAC’s CEO, Rebecca Weber, cites a survey conducted by the American Advisors Group [AAG], that shows more than 90% of the 65-plus segment of the U.S. population have a strong desire to remain in their own homes rather than make a move to assisted living facilities as they age. But for many seniors aging in place is not as easy as it sounds, says Weber. The cost, health needs, transportation access and personal safety concerns can get in the way.

The Urban Institute notes that “Survey after survey has shown that older Americans overwhelmingly prefer to age in place. But aging in place may require some trade-offs. Staying in a home must be financially sustainable, but it should also maximize physical, social, and emotional well-being. Financial considerations include maintenance and repair costs and the cost of necessary safety retrofits (grab bars, lifts, ramps, etc.), as well as the general cost of living” at home.

The National Institute on Aging [NIA] recently posted a comprehensive “how to” guide for aging in place. It offers answers to questions that can arise for seniors considering remaining at home in their golden years. For example, the NIA guide covers such considerations as personal care needs, including health care, day to day household chores, financial issues and companionship if you are living alone. It also provides a list of resources that can help you deal with issues, including financial issues, that may arise. The guide includes an internet link to the USAging website that offers assistance for aging folks who choose to remain in their homes rather than relocate to assisted living facilities.

For those seniors who want to stay at home, there are a variety of resources in addition to USAging they can reach out to for help. Senior News offers this list of helpmates:

  • ADA (American Disabilities Act) Paratransit provides transportation for those who cannot use the fixed-route public transit system. Each state has it. If you qualify, they will give door to door service in a small bus.
  • Law schools offer free legal assistance to low-income seniors. Or contact you local Area on Aging Department, they can refer you to an elder law attorney.
  • BenefitsCheckUp.org: Quickly find benefit programs that could help you pay for medications, health care, food, and more. All from a reliable and trusted source.
  • Seniorcare.com/directory – has created over 8000 local senior guides that offer health care quality ratings, senior housing options and other resources for aging Americans.

We hope you've enjoyed this article. While you're here, we have a small favor to ask...

Support the AMAC Foundation. Our 501(c)(3) powers the AMAC Foundation’s Social Security Advisory Services. This team of nationally accredited advisors offers on-time, on-the-mark guidance for those approaching or receiving Social Security – at no cost.

Donate Now

If You Enjoy Articles Like This - Subscribe to the AMAC Daily Newsletter
and Download the AMAC News App

Sign Up Today Download

If You Enjoy Articles Like This - Subscribe to the AMAC Daily Newsletter!


Subscribe
Notify of
2 Comments
Newest
Oldest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Smike
2 months ago

Aging at home is no longer as simple or as pleasing as it was to those before us. I live in a small suburb of a small town in Western Washington (state), been here over 20 years. It was a very friendly, quiet place with little crime or problems. Now I lock my internal doors, sleep with a loaded gun within reach and conceal carry. Things changed and quickly. Empty land is no more, trees, parks and rural areas are all gone. Most of the town is unrecognizable from my memory of it. If I haven’t been there the last six months there’s little I recognize. Our streets are liter with trash, people don’t keep their yards up and their children run wild, are rude and destructive. Our community mailbox disappeared one night. These aren’t pleasing times for the elderly who want to live independently. So we tend to stay close to home. But even so, traffic has increased 10 fold, drugs are sold everywhere, unknown people are driving and walking through the neighbor at all hours of day and night. You don’t feel safe taking a local walk anymore. Everyone has a dog and they bark all night. All this security stuff is great for after the fact. So, move into a senior home for $8000 a month – I could but I ain’t – I’ll defend in place.

2
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x